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Merfolk & Shuryo

Showcasing netsuke from our membership
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Bakurae
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Re: Merfolk & Shuryo

Postby Bakurae » Fri Apr 13, 2018 12:16 pm

Yukari Yoshida's fascinating 2012 article on teijin (merman) netsuke also deserves a shoutout.

Alison

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chonchon
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Re: Merfolk & Shuryo

Postby chonchon » Fri Apr 13, 2018 12:45 pm

Wakayama rings all kind of bells for me; perhaps Netsuke were also part of the art and civilization of that area.

Firstly there was the famous Negoro Temple "NegoroJi", the surrounding communities in the hills and valleys filled with warrior monks who were to be a thorn in the side of Nobunaga and Hideyoshi. Why? Well, when guns first came to the mainland from Tanegashima in 1543, Negoro on the Kii peninsula (Wakayama) was one of the first areas where they began to be manufactured by local smiths. But they were already wealthy and thriving. The red Urushi with black flecks showing through, called Negoro-nuri, is an example of their traditional artistry. When the temple and the 3,000 marksmen monks were finally overrun, put to the sword and destroyed by Hideyoshi (you can still see musket ball holes in the remaining temple gateposts), those smiths and artists and craftsmen mainly fled to Osaka, just to the north-west.

Two of my proud possessions are Wakayama 和歌山, or Ki-Shu 紀州 guns, as they are described.
Last edited by chonchon on Fri Apr 13, 2018 12:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Piers

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neilholton
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Re: Merfolk & Shuryo

Postby neilholton » Sat Apr 14, 2018 9:51 am

souldeep wrote:PS Neil - was the Hidemitsu example you shared in your post signed? I have only been able to find one so far. Do you know of any other examples by this Wakayama artist?


Yes that one was signed, I did mean to have a bid on the piece but something must have distracted me. I have also seen a Shishi signed Hidemitsu that is very Natsuki-esque. Also in a VAN HAM sale recently there was a Shishi signed Karaku or something like that, it was certainly Osaka/Wakayama school related to this bunch.

chonchon wrote:Wakayama rings all kind of bells for me; perhaps Netsuke were also part of the art and civilization of that area.

Firstly there was the famous Negoro Temple "NegoroJi", the surrounding communities in the hills and valleys filled with warrior monks who were to be a thorn in the side of Nobunaga and Hideyoshi. Why? Well, when guns first came to the mainland from Tanegashima in 1543, Negoro on the Kii peninsula (Wakayama) was one of the first areas where they began to be manufactured by local smiths. But they were already wealthy and thriving. The red Urushi with black flecks showing through, called Negoro-nuri, is an example of their traditional artistry. When the temple and the 3,000 marksmen monks were finally overrun, put to the sword and destroyed by Hideyoshi (you can still see musket ball holes in the remaining temple gateposts), those smiths and artists and craftsmen mainly fled to Osaka, just to the north-west.

Two of my proud possessions are Wakayama 和歌山, or Ki-Shu 紀州 guns, as they are described.


Piers, one of the FINEST marine Netsuke you will ever see is signed Negoro Sokyu (Mentioned in Soken Kisho 1781) in the himotoshi and inked in red. He also carved superbly in Wood. The Ikkaku Sennin in the British Museum is by him, I will try and post an image later. He relates to another almost unheard of artist Mataemon from Wakayama. Osaka and Wakayama Netsuke of the early period live in the shadow of Kyoto Netsuke, I think the main reason for this is the lack of signature found on the Osaka and Wakayama versus the Kyoto. The lack of signature creates a disconnect for enthusiast but for me, Osaka and Wakayama play equally if not more of a role in the history of Netsuke art. After all, Osaka had the wealthiest merchants in all Japan, who ultimately were likely the majority of customers of our beloved Netsuke-shi.

Bakurae wrote:Are there any studies on what was happening there? The examples posted in this thread are knockouts.


I am afraid this (Osaka & Wakayama) is a neglected area of study. You might get a kick out of some information in our catalogue coming soon. Hopefully we can seriously expand our understand of the relationship between Osaka and Wakayama on in the future.


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