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Favorite Finds of 2017

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KPR
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby KPR » Mon Jan 08, 2018 10:15 pm

In conclusion
Probably the last find in 2017.

I bought this Netsuke on Saturday the 30th of December 2017 at 4 pm in an auction in Germany.

A wasp nest with two wasps. Signed TAMETAKA. I have already seen three Netsuke with this motif by Tametaka.
But this is the only lacquered Tametaka I know.
1431-004.jpg
Klaus

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jbjtennyo
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby jbjtennyo » Mon Jan 08, 2018 11:20 pm

That is a uniquely beautiful netsuke, Klaus! I have never seen that surface treatment before, and love the color variations in the nest itself. Is there any documentation that you can find regarding lacquering by Tametaka at all? Do you think it might have been an experimental piece? Sometimes artists just feel a need to try a different approach. What are your thoughts on it? Just fantastic, really!
Judy

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chonchon
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby chonchon » Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:57 am

Yes, Judy, allow me to agree with you.

Of course it is possible that someone else took it upon themself to lacquer it, in homage and to preserve it. That we will probably never know though, unless the style of lacquer usage is particularly unique and recognizable. In the meantime we file away the notion that Tametaka might have experimented with lacquer.

Klaus might just have sealed the deal on 2017! 8-)
Piers

Size is something.

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KPR
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby KPR » Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:58 am

The Netsuke arrived yesterday and I am particularly excited about the lacquering.

In the catalog "Eccentrics in Netsuke" by Paul Moss the number 51 shows a very similar piece, but without lacquering.
I can not imagine that one could produce my piece by a subsequent over-laquering of the Moss piece. Many subtleties were lost.
Downloads-004.jpg


Maybe Tametaka experimented with lacque. See remark in MCI.

IMG_20180109_081845.jpg
Klaus

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chonchon
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby chonchon » Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:59 am

Many subleties would be lost? Either way, congratulations on your fine Tametaka Netsuke Klaus. I can easily believe he did experiment.

Once upon a time I had a finely-carved Okame/Ofuku face mask signed Tame 為, and I always wondered which carver's hand it was.
Last edited by chonchon on Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Piers

Size is something.

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souldeep
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby souldeep » Tue Jan 09, 2018 1:52 pm

KPR wrote:In conclusion
Probably the last find in 2017.

I bought this Netsuke on Saturday the 30th of December 2017 at 4 pm in an auction in Germany.

A wasp nest with two wasps. Signed TAMETAKA. I have already seen three Netsuke with this motif by Tametaka.
But this is the only lacquered Tametaka I know.

What a way to bag an end to 2017! An important work. Congratulations :lust:
Piglet: "Pooh?" Pooh: "Yes, Piglet?" Piglet: "I've been thinking..." Pooh: "That's a very good habit to get into to, Piglet." - A.A. Milne.

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KPR
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby KPR » Thu Jan 18, 2018 1:21 pm

Addendum after weight determination.
At this netsuke Tametaka used a particularly light and therefore soft wood (hinoki?) In contrast to the woods he used otherwise.
Consequently, it was intended at the beginning to hardening it by lacquer/paint.
Therefore one can conclude that ......
Last edited by KPR on Thu Jan 18, 2018 1:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Klaus

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Clive
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby Clive » Thu Jan 18, 2018 6:37 pm

Yes.. that he carved and then lacquered it.
As an interesting aside.. although I have found no documented evidence to support the notion, I have discovered though experimentation by painting lacquer on woods of different density, that when the foundation coats are absorbed more into the wood, as they are with some of the softer woods, that it creates a much stronger and stable lacquered surface.

lohrberg
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby lohrberg » Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:13 pm

AFNetsuke wrote:I'm not very familiar with horse bits but I can't see one being used as the himotoshi on these Koku kiseruzutsu. It looks more to me like the fitting at the top of an abumi (stirrup). I will need to get a quick pic on my phone and post from there what I refer to. This one will be a solid attachment but there could just as well be a leather piece between the ring and the rest of the stirrup.
Did the Japanese have horse races and if so I suspect wagering was a big part of it. The same wealthy patrons of the races may likely have been coin collectors as well.


Horse Races in Japan - Modern and Traditional

Western-style horse racing came to Japan with Meiji times. The Yokohama Race Club, initiated by British residents was established in 1862.
In all other metropolitan areas racing clubs spread up. In 1923 there were already eleven clubs. Racing developped to the JRA (Japan Racing Association). Betting was allowed in 1906, later forbidden, then allowed again. Horseracing in Japan today can be compared to other hot spots like Hongkong, Paris, Ascot.

Horseracing however has a long history in Japan, but has nothing in common with western-style racing, though a horse and someone to ride the horse is part of it.

The first documented horse race was seen in Kyoto in the year 1093 during reign of Emperor Horikawa. This race was a Shinto ceremony. These ritual races spread all over Japan on the Shinto shrines compounds.

Nowaday the ritual is still en vogue on 5'th of May every year in the Kamigamo Jinja Shrine in Kyoto a little to the north from the Botanical Garden at the edge of the Kamo River.

There are 12, sometimes 20 horses, forming teams of two person's each, that means 6 or 10 races. The racing track is a straight strip, no bends or curves. There is a "left team" using the left part of the strip and the second for the right side. The jockeys of the left team are in red traditional costumes, they represent the Kamigamo Shrine, those of the right team are in black and represent the Hachimangu Shrine. Each team has a staff consisting of 2 guardians, a praying supporter with an assistant. The judges belong only to the left team, while the second rated right team have kind of novices of judges. The praying supporters are given court ranks for the day of the event.
The 2 jockeys do not start at the ame time. It is not important, who crosses the finish line first. The second jockey starts, when the first is already on his way. The judges try to find out, whether the distance between the horses shortens or elongates in the end. It may also happen, that the second jockey starts, when the first is through. Of importace besides the vitesse is the character of the horse, the costume, the posture and the overall impression.

Who wins then?
The left team always wins. The left team is the personification of LUCK. When the left wins, then there will be a rich rice harvest for the people. It means Happiness is all around.
And as so often in Japan: The Ritual of Kurabeuma (horse racing) is the duel between Good and Evil. The devil must loose! Very simple and a high ethecal stand, indeed.

Today this race on 5'th of May each year is a local festival for the city of Kyoto and vicinity (including some lost foreigners).

May be you might go this year? Save the date, May 5, entrance is free,

Reinhard
Last edited by lohrberg on Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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AFNetsuke
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Re: Favorite Finds of 2017

Postby AFNetsuke » Fri Feb 23, 2018 1:09 am

Great summary, Reinhardt. If I showed up there I'd end up on the right side horse for sure.
Alan


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