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Favourite finds of 2016

Showcasing netsuke from our membership
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Vlad
Posts: 5079
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 6:59 pm
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby Vlad » Fri Dec 23, 2016 2:17 pm

mss wrote:
I tend to agree. The vertical lines likely are partially obliterated continuations; the horizontal line just raised the question in my mind, knowing the faint character of signatures by this carver.

thanks,
mss


Milton, I am a little puzzled with this statement of yours, as all the most attractive to me personally pieces currently attributed to Yoshinaga had a very prominent and well placed signature. Could you please elaborate further? Thanks
Attachments
1666361.jpg
Shoki Yoshinaga, Midori_back.jpg
Tekkai, Yoshinaga, Sagemonoya 5_4.jpg
Yoshinaga Hotei2.JPG
Yoshinaga Cobbs 2.jpg
Yoshinaga Sarumavashi 1.jpg
Tartar Yoshinaga Bandini-Max.jpg
"Man sieht nur, was man weiß" - "One sees only what one knows". Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

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AFNetsuke
Posts: 6272
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 12:14 am
Location: Central California coast, USA

Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby AFNetsuke » Fri Dec 23, 2016 4:39 pm

Vlad, the signature examples you like do show variation of some strokes as well as in the cartouche which are oval, rectangular, and one rectangle with different top and bottom curved corners (I assume this "well placed" signature ran out of space at its bottom causing the the truncated variation?). In other words, I'm not sure what to make of this other than going back to letting the carving speak for itself and hardly caring about the signature. :o
Alan

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Vlad
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Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 6:59 pm
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby Vlad » Fri Dec 23, 2016 5:25 pm

Alan, it is most probable that these pieces (coming from the most prominent dealers, by the way) are carved by more than one carver. I just hope at least one of them was by the Yoshinaga considered to be the best of them, even if not the one mentioned in the book. Unfortunately we will not be ever able to confidently say whether and which one was by the listed in the SK. We have discussed it more than once before...
I have assumed you would recognize most, if not all of them anyway.

I just wanted to clarify where did the knowledge/perception that "Miura Yoshinaga signature was often written with faint, scratchy kanji" come from. What did I miss?
"Man sieht nur, was man weiß" - "One sees only what one knows". Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

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mss
Posts: 291
Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2009 8:09 pm
Location: Florida, South Carolina, USA

Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby mss » Fri Dec 23, 2016 6:44 pm

Vlad wrote:
mss wrote:
I tend to agree. The vertical lines likely are partially obliterated continuations; the horizontal line just raised the question in my mind, knowing the faint character of signatures by this carver.

thanks,
mss


Milton, I am a little puzzled with this statement of yours, as all the most attractive to me personally pieces currently attributed to Yoshinaga had a very prominent and well placed signature. Could you please elaborate further? Thanks



Miura Yoshinaga is a different carver than the Soken Kisho Koyoken Yoshinaga. Miura used a different kanji for the character “Naga,” K186 永, not, as used by the more famous Yoshinaga, K272 長. The Miura Yoshinaga signature was often carved faintly or in an inconspicuous position. The Yoshinaga mentioned in the Soken Kisho usually signed with bold kanji, often within a reserve. The early collectors, such as Behrens and Seymour, failed to differentiate the later Miura Yoshinaga from the earlier Soken Kisho carver, although both collections appear to contain carvings from the later Miura.

If you have further interest, please see INSJ, vol. 31, #1, which contains an article on the netsuke of Miura Yoshinaga, as well as examples of the two different signatures. For those without access to that copy of the Journal, I enclose images of the different signatures from that article.

Bottom row depicts signatures of the Soken Kisho carver Koyoken Yoshinaga (uses "Naga" K272 長).
The other signatures are examples of Miura's use of the K186 永 kanji for "Naga", as well as the faint, scratchy style he often favored.
Attachments
Screen Shot 2016-12-23 at 1.28.05 PM.png
Screen Shot 2016-12-23 at 1.28.32 PM.png
Screen Shot 2016-12-23 at 1.29.26 PM.png
Screen Shot 2016-12-23 at 1.29.00 PM.png

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Vlad
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Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 6:59 pm
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby Vlad » Fri Dec 23, 2016 7:42 pm

Thank you, Milton. I guess Seymour and Behrens were not the only two... :oops: Obviously, the two carvers differed not only by the signature. There is also some confusion with the signature in Davey, who identifies four different ones in the list, but attributes them differently. I will have to re-read the article...

P.S. A great article, Milton and very educational! Thank you! I actually had it bookmarked for later serious reading, but then something came on it's way...
"Man sieht nur, was man weiß" - "One sees only what one knows". Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

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AFNetsuke
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Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 12:14 am
Location: Central California coast, USA

Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby AFNetsuke » Sat Dec 24, 2016 4:37 pm

Thanks for the clarification, Milton. I'd also forgotten that article.
Alan

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neilholton
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Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 7:58 pm
Location: Saffron Walden
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Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby neilholton » Thu Dec 29, 2016 10:17 am

What a super Ryukyu Sagemono Steve! For me I think this could well be 18th Century. I love the inlay, this region really knew how to exploit every ounce of the MOP natural qualities. The ground compliments the theme, misty black and red. Congratulations what a great find.

Jill the saw repairer is a very good example of a middle period edo figure. As you say, subtle details which you can often only feel, like the knot on head.

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RoyT
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2015 9:00 am
Location: Norway

Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby RoyT » Thu Dec 29, 2016 1:13 pm

Hi,

My collection (?) so far is limited to 3 netsuke and they are all my favorites :D Since the two bought in 2016 has been shown in other topics I did dig out my old DSLR to take my own pictures of them. The Buaku mask was bought from Neil H. and the manju from a Norwegian collector not specializing in netsuke.
Attachments
Buaku mask front (1 of 1).jpg
manju front (1 of 1).jpg
Regards Roy

calbear
Posts: 107
Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2010 4:41 pm
Location: San Francisco, Ca

Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby calbear » Thu Dec 29, 2016 2:33 pm

Neil, thanks for your comments .... A couple of additional questions:

- do you have a sense of who would have commissioned and used such a large piece?
- are there characteristics that delineate Ryukyu vs. Somada work? ..

Thanks ....

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AFNetsuke
Posts: 6272
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 12:14 am
Location: Central California coast, USA

Re: Favourite finds of 2016

Postby AFNetsuke » Thu Dec 29, 2016 3:38 pm

Roy, keep taking your own photos. They are excellent.
Alan


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