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Chon's Reflections

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chonchon
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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby chonchon » Sun Mar 04, 2018 2:57 am

Yes, I agree Alan. I think the separate arrangement worked as a fashion for a perhaps short peaceful period towards the beginning of the Bakumatsu, with Netsuke-influenced crossover, but gradually people may have reverted to the old solid style (with secondary weapon potential as swords were abolished) which probably continued among older people until well into Meiji and even the early 20th century.
Last edited by chonchon on Sun Mar 04, 2018 6:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
Piers

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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby chonchon » Wed Mar 07, 2018 1:57 am

My second thought, Alan, is that strings are inherently weaker than a one-piece, and something like a brass or copper inkpot will be quite a heavy blob, leading to the subliminal fear of fraying and snapping, ie necessitating occasional change of strings. (A single solid unit yatate on the other hand could be passed down generation to generation.)
Sword hilts too have this problems, as of course Netsuke-Ojime-Inro, and samurai armour. Silk has a short life relatively speaking, and biodegrades naturally, so it needs a supporting system of artisans to do this replacement work. Hanging from the kimono of a leisurely gentleman perhaps they were fine for a while, but with the rough advent of the barbarian ships in the Bakumatsu, society fell into disorder and break-up.
As Netsuke evolved in order to deal with belts on Western-style clothing at the end of Edo and early Meiji, practically speaking they became Sashi-Netsuke or a solid lump integral with the top of a leather i.e. Hayamichi, or the better ones were sent for exhibitions or consigned to the backs of drawers. Perhaps yatate too reverted to a stronger and more reliable shape?
Last edited by chonchon on Sun Mar 11, 2018 4:06 am, edited 4 times in total.
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AFNetsuke
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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby AFNetsuke » Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:20 pm

Interesting thought, Piers.
Alan

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chonchon
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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby chonchon » Thu Mar 15, 2018 4:59 am

Sashi Netsuke spin-off, a gentleman’s Tamabukuro for musketballs. Lacquered leather and shibuichi clasp.

F4CF9C36-EFAB-4361-B5F1-D9B960CE23C5.jpeg


587F8206-163A-4C32-9529-B98B16A08316.jpeg
Last edited by chonchon on Fri Mar 16, 2018 1:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
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mss
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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby mss » Thu Mar 15, 2018 12:41 pm

chonchon wrote:There is a pretty good explanation of yatate with illustrations here: http://www.stutler.cc/pens/yatate/

According to one source (Wiki) a yatate is still formally and symbolically passed round for collecting assenting seals of ruling party cabinet ministers.
内閣の閣議決定は閣僚の花押による署名を必要とするため、持ち回り閣議では閣僚の署名を集めるために現在も矢立が使われている。


For those interested in further examples of yatate, there is a book, in Japanese, but with good color illustrations, on the Tawara collection of yatate.
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chonchon
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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby chonchon » Fri Mar 16, 2018 1:40 am

In that unusual example on the cover we can see again the convention at work, how that brush holder functions as Netsuke, the inkpot as sagemono, and the sagemono set requires an ojime for completion. Thanks for the heads-up.
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mss
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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby mss » Fri Mar 16, 2018 5:25 am

chonchon wrote:In that unusual example on the cover we can see again the convention at work, how that brush holder functions as Netsuke, the inkpot as sagemono, and the sagemono set requires an ojime for completion. Thanks for the heads-up.


Exactly how smoking sets evolved, the pipe case acting as a sashi type netsuke, suspending, with an intervening ojime, the tabako-ire or tonkotsu.

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chonchon
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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby chonchon » Fri Mar 16, 2018 9:44 am

Watching this week's Sumo tournament on TV this evening I was struck by the bright designs on the elaborate kimono of the 'Gyoji' referee. As the camera panned in, I noticed a pretty little inro hanging from the obi on his right side, sort of inside the slit in his pantaloons. You could see a small round Netsuke, and ojime too. For example:

http://wol.nikkeibp.co.jp/article/colum ... 2/ph02.jpg
Last edited by chonchon on Fri Mar 16, 2018 9:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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dougsanders
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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby dougsanders » Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:18 pm

D'ya think he keeps anything in that inro?

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chonchon
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Re: Chon's Reflections

Postby chonchon » Mon Mar 19, 2018 1:08 am

I hate to think!

Sadly the little ball purse above was taken from me almost immediately by a friend, but luckily he allowed me to photograph it first for this forum. He says he wants to put his hearing aid controller inside, but as he was forcing it and I could actually see the leather ripping, I suspect it will soon get trashed. :(

Yesterday I found two old Netsuke at an out-of-the-way market. One was so crude, in two meanings, that even I did not have the inclination to buy it. Cheap it would have surely been. It was the top end of a rough phallus, attached round the haft to an old saw in a sheath, the kind that a carpenter or tree surgeon might have carried. I imagined my wife's face as I brought more dusty junk back to the house and finally gave it a pass.

The other was an early leaf with a monkey and Nasu aubergine/eggplant on it. Rustically carved in black lacquered perhaps rosewood; secondary himotoshi had been drilled as the old holes were already reaching their limits. This is perhaps the third or fourth Netsuke I have found in close to twenty years with a perished or nearly broken bridge, and subsequent but still old redrilled Himotoshi holes.
Last edited by chonchon on Mon Mar 19, 2018 4:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
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