netsuke and sagemono lounge : Disclaimer - Please click anywhere on this bar to expand/contract the content.

Puzzled by Signature

Discussions of carvers, workshops and attributions. A forum to also find help on, or discuss, signatures.
User avatar
tanukisan
Posts: 594
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 3:30 pm
Location: Solihull , West Midlands

Puzzled by Signature

Postby tanukisan » Fri Jun 16, 2017 9:08 am

This signature on a late Meiji period netsuke has me stumped - can anybody help please? The first might be 'KO' the second 'DAI' the third 'NICHI' followed by a kakihan, but this is not a name combination I have come across. More on this netsuke in another thread - Subjects and Legends in Japanese Art.

DSCF3842 (2).JPG

John 


User avatar
chonchon
Posts: 6941
Joined: Wed May 18, 2005 9:16 am
Location: Japan

Re: Puzzled by Signature

Postby chonchon » Fri Jun 16, 2017 9:51 am

Words written on a kinchaku purse, rather than a signature. 火 (?) suggests that it may have contained flint and tinder. Kuchibi 口火 has the meaning of to set something off.

The final kanji looks like 思... which would be 'thoughts', which could be the warning to take care when using fire. (Normally expressed as Hi no yojin. 火の用心)

So, having edited several times, :) I will go with "Kuchibi omoi", a warning to oneself when setting fire to something, fire being one of the Four Great Disasters.

PS That is a terrible photograph, though, John!!! :D
Piers

Size is something.

User avatar
tanukisan
Posts: 594
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 3:30 pm
Location: Solihull , West Midlands

Re: Puzzled by Signature

Postby tanukisan » Fri Jun 16, 2017 10:13 am

Thanks Piers, apologies about the photo - here are improved versions -

DSCF3856.JPG
DSCF3856 (2).JPG

John 


User avatar
Oishii
Posts: 817
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2015 5:44 am
Location: Belgium

Re: Puzzled by Signature

Postby Oishii » Fri Jun 16, 2017 10:35 am

chonchon wrote:Words written on a kinchaku purse, rather than a signature. 火 (?) suggests that it may have contained flint and tinder. Kuchibi 口火 has the meaning of to set something off.

The final kanji looks like 思... which would be 'thoughts', which could be the warning to take care when using fire. (Normally expressed as Hi no yojin. 火の用心)

So, having edited several times, :) I will go with "Kuchibi omoi", a warning to oneself when setting fire to something, fire being one of the Four Great Disasters.

PS That is a terrible photograph, though, John!!! :D

Great info, Piers !
As a comparison, here is a netsuke of Daruma, from the offerings of Lou, that has a fire warning sign as well.
It is described as "Unsigned, but it is inscribed with the words “Hino Yojin 火の用心” , which literally translates to: "Be cautions with fire" ".
Screen Shot 2017-06-16 at 12.30.06.png
Jan

User avatar
chonchon
Posts: 6941
Joined: Wed May 18, 2005 9:16 am
Location: Japan

Re: Puzzled by Signature

Postby chonchon » Fri Jun 16, 2017 11:03 am

Yay, much better John! Thanks. :D

Jan, yes, that is a great example of "Hi no Yojin". In many local villages in Japan even today, members of the local committee will walk around the streets in the evenings clacking their wooden blocks together and shouting it out.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=59qOsX-i2q8
Piers

Size is something.

User avatar
tanukisan
Posts: 594
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 3:30 pm
Location: Solihull , West Midlands

Re: Puzzled by Signature

Postby tanukisan » Fri Jul 28, 2017 11:24 am

Returning to my netsuke of a pipe holding woman sitting on a bundle of twigs, I recently spotted a manju listed in the Mang Collection Sale (Mang Collection Lot 94, Quinn’s Auction 7/12/2012 - By Shuyusai Minkoku 3rd. Tokyo, Mid 19th century. , Mid 19th century. Seated on a bundle of twigs and smoking her pipe as she rests on her journey. Ko-ji Hoten, Vol 2. page 129 states, "A woman from the village of O-hara. Most of the occupants of this area are employed in the business of firewood, and it is chiefly the women who are charged with transporting the wood from the forest to their neighborhood."1 5/8in (4cm).
Mang Ohara me manju.jpg


Ohara is a little village in the mountains a 60 minute bus ride north from Kyoto station at the foot of Mount Hiei. Ohara was previously known as Ono in the Tale of Genji. In the novel Ono was known for the nunnery that Ukifune, a daughter of the Eighth Prince retired to. Not knowing who her father was, she was caught in a love triangle and tried to escape by throwing herself into the Uji River. After a miraculous rescue she spent her new life as a nun in the peaceful countryside surroundings in Ohara.
“Oharame” women, who wear traditional farming dress and sell firewood and vegetables from carts around the village. You can see them at the Oharame Matsuri (Ohara Women's Festival) in the last two weeks of May.
Attachments
DSCF3845.JPG

John 



Return to “Artists & Signatures”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest