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Subject of this piece

What subject or legend is depicted in your netsuke or sagemono?
Roy
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby Roy » Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:41 pm

Thanks Alan and Souldeep, for your help in understanding the subject. It does make sense as the work of maybe a bored pupil importing some fun by combining different new characters in a known context.
When you say late Hidemasa line, when do you reckon this was produced?
Regards

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chonchon
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby chonchon » Wed Mar 14, 2018 12:32 am

Rather than two bumps for his horns, your oni has one Roy, but it looks like a lump formed by getting whacked by Shoki's bamboo branch. Hanging from the branch we can see a wooden sake 'masu' cup with metal crosspiece, and two purses of coins (?). There may have been a custom somewhere of tying presents to a bamboo tree, as for Tanabata when messages are tied to bamboo.
Last edited by chonchon on Wed Mar 14, 2018 12:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
Piers

Size is something.

Roy
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby Roy » Wed Mar 14, 2018 1:17 am

Yes Piers, I thought about it too. So basically pre getting beaten up this Oni had no horns. That’s unusual for an Oni isn’t it so? As pointed out before the fingers and toes of his points towards Oni though.

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tanukisan
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby tanukisan » Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:55 am

IVORY NETSUKE By Tomochika. Depicting a Buddhist priest removing the horns from an oni.
Attachments
Oni horns.jpg

John 


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chonchon
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby chonchon » Wed Mar 14, 2018 9:22 pm

Is that yours John? Love it! What an unusual find.
Piers

Size is something.

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tanukisan
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby tanukisan » Wed Mar 14, 2018 9:40 pm

From an auction at Eldred's November 28th 2007, ex Collection, Museum of Fine Arts. Sadly, it is not mine though!

John 


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AFNetsuke
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby AFNetsuke » Wed Mar 14, 2018 11:11 pm

One horn or lump on the head? It's clearly an Oni with 3 clawed hands, tiger skin pants, and fangs. Who is delivering the beating and why? Kintaro?
20180314_160253.jpg

20180314_160138.jpg

20180314_160328.jpg

20180314_160355.jpg
Alan

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chonchon
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby chonchon » Thu Mar 15, 2018 4:33 am

This one is “Momo Taro no Oni Taiji” according to an expert in the subject. 桃太郎の鬼退治
Piers

Size is something.

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tanukisan
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby tanukisan » Thu Mar 15, 2018 9:43 am

Momotarō:
Momotarō came to Earth inside a giant peach which was found floating down a river, by an old, childless woman who was washing clothes there. The woman and her husband discovered the child when they tried to open the peach to eat it. The child explained that he had been sent by Heaven to be their son. The couple named him Momotarō, from momo (peach) and tarō (eldest son in the family).

Years later, Momotarō left his parents to fight a band of marauding Oni on a distant island. En route, Momotarō met and befriended a talking dog, monkey and pheasant, who agreed to help him in his quest. At the island, Momotarō and his animal friends penetrated the demons' fort and beat the band of demons into surrendering. Momotarō and his new friends returned home with the demons' plundered treasure and the demon chief as a captive. Momotarō and his family lived comfortably from then on.

Kintaro:
A child of superhuman strength, he was raised by a yama-uba ("mountain witch") on Mount Ashigara. He became friendly with the animals of the mountain, and later, after catching Shuten-dōji, the terror of the region around Mount Ooe, he became a loyal follower of Minamoto no Yorimitsu.The legends agree that even as a toddler, Kintarō was active and indefatigable, plump and ruddy, wearing only a bib with the kanji for "gold" (金) on it. His only other accoutrement was a hatchet. His friends were mainly the animals of Mt. Kintoki and Mt. Ashigara. He was phenomenally strong, able to smash rocks into pieces, uproot trees, and bend trunks like twigs. His animal friends served him as messengers and mounts, and some legends say that he even learned to speak their language. Several tales tell of Kintarō's adventures, fighting monsters and oni (demons), beating bears in sumo wrestling, and helping the local woodcutters fell trees.

Momotarō or Kintaro depicted in this netsuke ?

John 


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souldeep
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Re: Subject of this piece

Postby souldeep » Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:51 am

dougsanders wrote:No one has mentioned the red and possibly green (the photos are a little blurry to determine) ink used in the engraved decoration of the clothing. This is often an indicator,for me at least, of spurious origin. Thoughts?

I understand your concern regarding the potential spurious origin of red / green ink we see quite often on those items we tend to categorise as NLO.

However in this instance, I didn't note this in the example being shared. I put down the colouration anomalies to poor photography and reflections.

I sourced some better images. These appear to have been white balanced correctly, and also avoid any environmental colour pollution. Hope they help the study. Click on an image to open a larger version.
obj1.jpg
obj2.jpg
obj3.jpg
obj4.jpg
Piglet: "Pooh?" Pooh: "Yes, Piglet?" Piglet: "I've been thinking..." Pooh: "That's a very good habit to get into to, Piglet." - A.A. Milne.


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