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Competition time!

What subject or legend is depicted in your netsuke or sagemono?
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tanukisan
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Competition time!

Postby tanukisan » Thu Sep 21, 2017 12:25 pm

DSCF3889.JPG
Based on my latest lacquered pipecase acquisition here is a chance for anyone on this forum interested in Japanese subjects and legends to answer all or any of the following questions in the next 48 hours or so.....

1/ What is depicted here?
2/ When and where did this event take place?
3/ Can you name the samurai warrior depicted?
4/ Which of the 5 common types of arrowheads is he using?
5/ What was his career later in life?
6/ Toughest question - What was the name of his horse?
Attachments
DSCF3887.JPG

John 


onimh
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Re: Competition time!

Postby onimh » Thu Sep 21, 2017 1:09 pm

4) Karimata-rope cutter

Very nice piece!
Last edited by onimh on Thu Sep 21, 2017 1:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

mss
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Re: Competition time!

Postby mss » Thu Sep 21, 2017 1:45 pm

Is this the legend depicted?

From Joly:

NASU NO YOICHI. Archer whose clan took the fan as their crest, in allusion to his performance at the battle of Yashima, in 1185.
When the Taira were driven from Kioto by the Minamoto in 1182, the Empress Nii no Ama flew with the child, Emperor ANTOKU, to the shrine of ITSUKUMISHA, where thirty pink fans, bearing the design of the sun disc (Hi no maru), were kept. The head priest gave one to Antoku, saying that it contained in the red disc the Kami of the dead Emperor TAKAKURA (1169-1180), and would cause arrows to recoil upon the enemy. The fan was accordingly attached to a mast of the Taira ship, on which a court lady is always depicted, and a challenge sent to Minamoto no Yoshitsune, which was accepted by one of his archers, Nasu no Yoichi, who on horseback rode in the waves and with a well-directed arrow broke the rivet which held the leaves together, and thus shattered the fan.

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tanukisan
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Re: Competition time!

Postby tanukisan » Thu Sep 21, 2017 1:52 pm

Excellent start Matthew and Milton - that's questions 1-4 of 6 questions answered!

John 


mss
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Re: Competition time!

Postby mss » Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:16 pm

remaining answers:

From Wikipedia:

After the Genpei War, Nasu no Yoichi was made daimyō of Tottori Castle, but he lost this position to Kajiwara Kagetoki after being defeated in a hunting competition. He left Echigo Province and—following the death of Minamoto no Yoritomo—Nasu became a Buddhist monk in the Jōdo Shinshū sect. Eventually, he formed a temple, which has since been passed down to the oldest son of the Nasu family. For administrative purposes, detailed records were kept regarding who was to inherit the temple. As a result of this, it was possible to trace the Nasu lineage right up to the destruction of the temple during World War II. Most believe that he died at the age of 64, in the year 1232, during a ceremony in Kobe honoring those who died in the Genpei War.


from kyogen-in-english.com:

The horse's name was Koguro of Nasu

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tanukisan
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Re: Competition time!

Postby tanukisan » Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:38 pm

As Minamoto no Yoshitsune said to Nasu No Yoichi, take a bow, Milton!
All 6 questions correctly answered in a record time.
The first correct answer ( number 4) referred to the bifurcated arrow - Karimata ("Rope Cutter" / Bifurcated / Two Pointed) These arrowheads were used not only for battle but for hunting large game. They are sometimes referred to as 'rope cutters' but were most likely not used to cut ropes.

John 


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Clive
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Re: Competition time!

Postby Clive » Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:54 pm

tanukisan wrote:The first correct answer ( number 4) referred to the bifurcated arrow - Karimata ("Rope Cutter" / Bifurcated / Two Pointed) These arrowheads were used not only for battle but for hunting large game. They are sometimes referred to as 'rope cutters' but were most likely not used to cut ropes.


I once did a restoration job for an prominent American collector in which I had to repair a "rope-cutter" arrow head and since the item was of high value I ended up doing quite a bit of research on the subject. There is considerable debate amongst armourers as to its purpose but the most likely I concluded were that they were used to inflict serious leg muscle and ligament damage to mounted horses and hunted prey..
Last edited by Clive on Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

onimh
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Re: Competition time!

Postby onimh » Thu Sep 21, 2017 3:48 pm

As I watch a rafter of turkeys (I had to look it up) walk by I think they might also have been used as a one shot decapitator!
Are there turkeys, or the equivalent, in Japan?

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tanukisan
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Re: Competition time!

Postby tanukisan » Thu Sep 21, 2017 3:55 pm

Google search quote -
'So why are there no turkey farms in Japan? It’s possible that the Japanese government has banned the import of live turkeys for some reason but it’s more likely that there simply isn’t a large enough market in Japan to support large scale turkey farming. Historically many Japanese didn’t have ovens so the “traditional” roast turkey wouldn’t have been possible and realistically turkey doesn’t have a place in Japanese gastronomy, even if one considers yōshoku, hence no demand.'

John 


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AFNetsuke
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Re: Competition time!

Postby AFNetsuke » Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:05 pm

The Green Pheasant is Japan's national bird. It would take a very accurate archer or very stealthy hunter to decapitate one. Clive's answer seems more likely.
BTW, John, it's a very nice musozutsu and great subject!
Alan


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