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Petite ryusa...

Discussions, identification and analysis of the different types of Metals used in Netsuke, predominately Kagamibuta composition.
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NetsukeManiac
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Location: Scottsdale, Arizona

Postby NetsukeManiac » Wed Jul 29, 2015 5:37 am

Here is a recently acquired floral ryusa of only 32 mm in diameter. Can you guess the material?

Dave

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Tengu
Posts: 608
Joined: Sat Jan 24, 2009 8:23 am

Postby Tengu » Wed Jul 29, 2015 7:30 am

looks like copper, probably it is much more complicated.

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NetsukeManiac
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Location: Scottsdale, Arizona

Postby NetsukeManiac » Wed Jul 29, 2015 7:33 am

Well I guess that was too easy! Yes, it is some sort of copper alloy. The two halves, which are identical, are soldered together 180 degrees apart.

Dave

billweb
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Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2011 10:40 pm
Location: -So. Calif.

Postby billweb » Wed Jul 29, 2015 7:35 am


Is it a combination of bronze and copper-- shibuichi style?

Bill
















is it

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NetsukeManiac
Posts: 3794
Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2010 3:05 am
Location: Scottsdale, Arizona

Postby NetsukeManiac » Wed Jul 29, 2015 8:00 am

Pure copper sheet would be far too soft and maleable. I assume it is a harder/stiffer copper alloy of some sort, but probably not shibuichi as it looks too copperish.

Dave

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chonchon
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Joined: Wed May 18, 2005 9:16 am
Location: Japan

Postby chonchon » Wed Jul 29, 2015 8:02 am

Copper with bits of brass (shinchu) inlay. (?) Unusual and neat.
Piers

Size is something.

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AFNetsuke
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Location: Central California coast, USA

Postby AFNetsuke » Wed Jul 29, 2015 5:05 pm

Dave, I'm not so sure about pure copper being so malleable/bendable. The first large cents minted in the U.S. in 1793 were similar diameter of around 28mm and the composition listed as "nearly pure copper, or copper as pure as it emerged from smelting, without any deliberate addition of other metals". It was not until 1857 that 120 parts per thousand of nickel was added to make a more durable alloy but even the first six decades of the early pieces held up pretty well. Those coins had to suffer a lot of abuse back then. I suspect the shape of your copper netsuke consisting of two soldered domes gives it some structural integrity against dents and bending.
Alan

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souldeep
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Location: London

Postby souldeep » Wed Jul 29, 2015 7:25 pm

Nice piece Dave - delicate work.
Piglet: "Pooh?" Pooh: "Yes, Piglet?" Piglet: "I've been thinking..." Pooh: "That's a very good habit to get into to, Piglet." - A.A. Milne.

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NetsukeManiac
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Postby NetsukeManiac » Wed Jul 29, 2015 10:27 pm

AFNetsuke wrote:Dave, I'm not so sure about pure copper being so malleable/bendable. The first large cents minted in the U.S. in 1793 were similar diameter of around 28mm and the composition listed as "nearly pure copper, or copper as pure as it emerged from smelting, without any deliberate addition of other metals". It was not until 1857 that 120 parts per thousand of nickel was added to make a more durable alloy but even the first six decades of the early pieces held up pretty well. Those coins had to suffer a lot of abuse back then. I suspect the shape of your copper netsuke consisting of two soldered domes gives it some structural integrity against dents and bending.


True, but the material this netsuke is made of is much thinner than a penny and fairly 'porous' (maybe a better word is 'perforated') which greatly reduces the material's strength. This piece is also very light in weight. If I get a chance to weigh it, I will post it's weight.

Dave

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DSW90049
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Postby DSW90049 » Wed Jul 29, 2015 10:35 pm

It's a very delicate and pretty piece, Dave. I have seen few in this material but the metal workers had to completely re-tool during Meiji to put food on their and their families' tables. Thanks for sharing views of this one. Are you coming by chance to the INS Baltimore Convention in Sept so we can finally meet live and in person?!?
"There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . . "
Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning, H. Seymour Trower(1898)~~~~David


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