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Could this be Umimatsu?...

Discussions, identification and analysis of the different types of natural shell and corals
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Clive
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Postby Clive » Fri Jan 03, 2014 5:20 pm

Thank you Gentlemen.. 8-)

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DSW90049
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Postby DSW90049 » Fri Jan 03, 2014 6:17 pm

Clive, correct me if I am wrong, but didn't you have this piece, 'snails on log with [growing things that you can identify best ~ I'm just a city boy]' on display, at the 2011 INS Beverly Hills Convention? I recall handling it for a very long time, and being quite astounded by the realism, detail, and elegance of this piece.

Am I having a Senior Moment, or is my recollection accurate?Image
"There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . . "
Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning, H. Seymour Trower(1898)~~~~David

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AFNetsuke
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Postby AFNetsuke » Fri Jan 03, 2014 6:33 pm

David, I thought it was the one I also handled there. I thought all those inlays looked quite delicate and at risk of damage but was most surprised to find they were well anchored and very solid.
Alan

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Clive
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Postby Clive » Fri Jan 03, 2014 7:08 pm

Yes.. I did exhibit it at the Beverly Hills Convention. I'm glad you noticed it wasn't as delicate as it looked Alan as that was one of my goals when designing it. Nature designs things like that all the time.. bracket fungus often looks incredible delicate growing on the side of rotten logs but if you try to break a section off, it's as tough as leather and very firmly fixed. I thought that an interesting quality to try to capture. My fungus are carved from boars tusk, an extremely tough material and each inlay has a long "foot" that is inlayed deep into the log. Same with the snail.. the shells look like they just sit delicately on the snail's body but they are in fact just the tip of a deeply inlayed column of material. I'm sure if somebody took a screwdriver to the piece it could be damaged but as I made the piece I constantly rolled it vigorously between my hands to test it's strength and tactile quality.

It should last. :D

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DSW90049
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Postby DSW90049 » Fri Jan 03, 2014 7:35 pm

Wow!;)

Congrats to the lucky owner!! This one, and the 'clownfish among anemone,' and the 'boar's head' (on display in London in May 2013 at the INS convention), are the three of Clive's works with which i am most familiar in terms of having been able to handle, and really study them. Each is an amazing masterpiece of, dare I say, miniature sculpture . . . how does that title sound?Image
"There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . . "
Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning, H. Seymour Trower(1898)~~~~David

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chonchon
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Postby chonchon » Mon Jan 06, 2014 6:05 pm

Many thanks for the informative photos of your wonderful work.
Piers

Size is something.

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Natasha
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Umimatsu

Postby Natasha » Wed Jan 25, 2017 6:55 am

souldeep wrote: I was recently able to handle to a frog on a branch by Clive too. It's in one form of Unimatsu.
528631_381309758604037_2139200914_n.jpg
I was simply awestruck. .. I still don't understand how it was possible to display the sensitive fragile layers of this specific Unimatsu along with the diverse colouration I witnessed in the handling of the piece. I guess you guys will all keep me in the dark on how you create these modern works of art - but I understand this must remain a trade secret ;) ...

Umimatsu is not fragile, it is very comfortable raw material, black coral contains a lot of protein, so it is resilient, it is well-cut with any tool in all directions, perfectly polished.
Yes, Ykku is very interesting artist, he is also one of my favorite!

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souldeep
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Umimatsu

Postby souldeep » Wed Jan 25, 2017 8:21 am

Interesting. I'd always understood that specific forms of coral flake apart easily if cut incorrectly.

Do you have any works you can share in Unimatsu Natasha? I can't find an example on your site but am very interested to see. Black Unimatsu is my favourite material, and I've been collecting examples in this material the past year or so. Maybe you'd be willing to share on the Natasha thread, as this one is more tool related.
Piglet: "Pooh?" Pooh: "Yes, Piglet?" Piglet: "I've been thinking..." Pooh: "That's a very good habit to get into to, Piglet." - A.A. Milne.

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Natasha
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Umimatsu

Postby Natasha » Wed Jan 25, 2017 8:59 am

There is a collector in my city, he collects various curiosities. One day his young son about 4 years planed a dagger. The handle was carved out of a large piece of black coral, where the lion has been portrayed fantastically done, each strand of wool-hairs. I had to deepen the relief and re-cut his paw with claws and fur. This was my first encounter with the black coral. I really enjoyed working with black coral, many opportunities to perfect detailing. I would be happy to work on black coral, but I have no piece. Oops!

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LUBlub
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Umimatsu

Postby LUBlub » Wed Jan 25, 2017 1:07 pm

souldeep wrote:Interesting..... Black Unimatsu is my favourite material, and I've been collecting examples in this material the past year or so. Maybe share on the Natasha thread, as this one is more tool related.


Martyn, I'm glad of your comments on modern artists, as everybody knows I am a fervent admirer and collector of many of them, alive or dead, on a par with ancient netsuke, because the beauty of 'art is timeless.

With license of posters because we are off topic, but since you love the material unimatsu I am attaching photos of two pieces in that material, the dry salmon unsigned , the other signed Baiko, rare artist with only one recorded piece in wood. (ND) … (This piece is recorded in the Lazarnick – book one – pag 135, with the wrong indication of tortoise shell)
Attachments
The LUB Collection (4).JPG
The LUB Collection.JPG
The LUB Collection (19).JPG
The LUB Collection (22).JPG
Excellence in netsuke art don't need signature or pedigree, or age, only quality, aesthetics, beauty.


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