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Marine Ivory?

Discussions, identification and analysis of the different types of Marine Ivory
Peternz
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Postby Peternz » Tue May 27, 2014 11:17 pm

This netsuke has numerous small holes, often in groups of three.
I can see no schreger lines. Would this indicate a one of the marine ivory ?.
Are they worm holes.? Image
Thank you
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1913939_DSCF4091.JPG
Peter Dunn

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chonchon
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Postby chonchon » Wed May 28, 2014 6:31 am

The holes are artificially drilled in the oak, ginkgo etc. leaves, Peter, to give a sense of autumn, the rottenness, the transience of things. The material is walrus tusk, as you can tell from the crushed ice crystalline effect in the darker areas. A nice little ryusa manju Netsuke, IMHO.
Piers

Size is something.

neilholton
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Postby neilholton » Wed May 28, 2014 1:24 pm

"Crushed Ice" I like that term Piers, might have to borrow that one in the future.

Peternz
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Postby Peternz » Wed May 28, 2014 5:51 pm

Piers again thank you.
I had not realised the holes were made by the shi,or how to identify Walrus ivory. another day and something else learned.
Had the enhancement always been used by the shi, or of mainly a limited period of time.
Being honest one of my least favoured netsuke.

Peter
Peter Dunn

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AFNetsuke
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Postby AFNetsuke » Wed May 28, 2014 7:22 pm

Peter, I like it more than some others you've posted. The appearance of "decay" is not uncommon in netsuke of nature subjects. It is a Japanese esthetic that some Westerners don't seem to appreciate.
As for the walrus characteristics, please refer to other posts on its identification. It is quite characteristic and you'll also notice many pieces are oval rather than round which is simply using all the available material as that's how the tusk is shaped. Some call the "crushed ice" "oatmeal". or perhaps "crystallized" appearance.
Here's a piece in walrus also with the drilled holes depicting decay. The largest image of the edge shows a bit of the "crystallized" material which is diagnostic of walrus.
Image

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1914891_Manju_Walrus_reduced_size.jpg
Alan

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chonchon
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Postby chonchon » Thu May 29, 2014 12:21 am

A nice example, Alan. They are growing on me. 8-)
Piers

Size is something.

Peternz
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Postby Peternz » Fri May 30, 2014 9:08 pm

Thank you all for help in understanding more about my ryusa, manju netsuke.
It was all new to me, getting a better feel of the carvers intent helps a lot.
And due to some favourable comments from you I now look at it with more appreciation.

Thank you
Peter Dunn

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DSW90049
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Postby DSW90049 » Fri May 30, 2014 10:40 pm

Peter, you ask good questions - the ones many wanting to learn, are often afraid to ask.

Keep thinking & questioning.
That is the purpose of this Forum.
We help each other learn by sharing knowledge and opinions here.
A 'Hive Mind,' if that term is not too 'New Age-y,' for you!

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And, when we are lucky enough to have superbly knowledgeable longtime INS-supporting dealers, like Rosemary Bandini, Neil Holton and Alain Ducros weigh in and post here, and Clive Hallam, one of the world's most knowledgeable people on materials and restoration work (& an awe-inspiring netsuke carver, to boot), we offer here in real time, something which only the International Netsuke Society can deliver.

If you haven't yet, you should join INS, receive & enjoy our INS Journal, and we can all look forward to meeting you at the next INS biennial Convention, Sept. 2015, in Baltimore, MD, US of A, tentativelly, where you will see more netsuke and sagemono under one roof than you can imagine.
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GiantSquid
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Postby GiantSquid » Sat May 31, 2014 3:44 pm

Here's another one similar to what you have shown Peter, also marine ivory (walrus tusk):

Image
Attachments
1917686_autumn_leaves_1.JPG
"The difficulty lies not so much in developing new ideas as in escaping from old ones." John Maynard Keynes, 1883 - 1946

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Peternz
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Postby Peternz » Sat May 31, 2014 10:02 pm

Giant Squid.
Thank you, yes they are very similar, can you put a period to your one?.

Regards
Peter Dunn


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