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Tips for visiting Japan

A topic area to discuss whatever comes to mind from personal stories to images of your most recent holiday.
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OliMos
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Feb 13, 2014 2:27 pm
Location: London

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby OliMos » Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:49 pm

I've not actually been to Japan, but two must-see places for me are Shisendo

https://www.jnto.go.jp/eng/spot/gardens/shisendo-temple.html

and Mampuku-ji

https://en.japantravel.com/kyoto/obakusan-mampukuji/6165

Mamushi
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Location: Ikebukuro

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby Mamushi » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:17 pm

I suggest you to do not go to Hanazono jinjia and Kasai jinjia since there are no fine items to buy there ,they are more flea markets with vintage kimonos and vintage house items than antique markets.The Oedo forum at Yurakucho will offer you more selection and an higher number of dealers,set up start at 8:00am. You can give a try even to the Tomioka Hachinmangu antique fair in Fukagawa,not a great number of dealers in those summer months but sometimes there are interesting items to buy there(set up start at 6am). Just keep in mind that those outdoor events will be cancelled if it will be rainy so keep an eye on the meteo.
Anyway if you will be in Tokyo this weekend i suggest you to go to the Antique Jumboree at Tokyo Big Sight,there will be around 500dealers,i think 35%are selling asian antiques and the 65% will sell western antiques. It will start this friday till sunday ,ticket is 1000¥ for Saturday and Sunday and 3000¥ forFriday(early buyers day).
Many dealers that usually have their stands at Yurakucho and at other sunday's flea markets in the tokyo area will probably have their stands here rather than in their usual flea markets since this is the main event for antiques in the Tokyo area for the month of August. Good luck and happy hunting ;)

lohrberg
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Location: Hannover - Germany

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby lohrberg » Mon Jul 31, 2017 7:07 pm

Spots in Japan

When Klaus Riess of Munic asked me today in a telephone call to post something in the "Tips for visiting Japan", I simply said "Ney". He asked me why. My answer: For the general track Tokyo, Kyoto, Nara, Osaka, Nagasaki there are tourist guide books.

I could recommend out of the way spots like Ojima Island, Mitsue, Miyama, Shirahama, Takayama, Takao san or the absolutely top Naoshima. But what sense does it make to recommend these or other places, when someone makes a first trip to Japan. Then there is Tokyo, Kyoto, Nara and Osaka. On a fifth or tenth trip one should do the off the track places.

Looking into the Forum right now I come along Oli Moss' post, recommending the Mampukuji. Wow, this is not the normal trip, its off track and this makes me, to step in with some broader remarks:

Mampukuji is near Kyoto, southward. It belongs to the area of Uji city, town or village. This area is famous and we are familiar with Uji when we read the Tales of Genji (Genji Monogatari). Prince Genji was out on many occasions in Uji on his amourous overnight stays.

Uji area has at least 3 very interesting places worth to see. I made a visit in April this year.
First is the Mampukuji (please look up google). It is not crowded by tourist, as it lays off the track. During my visit I met , lets say about 15 people which is next to nothing.

3 km further you can find the Mimurotoji Temple. The place is not mentioned in tourist guide book, that I have acces to. Nearly no visitors around. A beautifully hilly scenery. I attach two images below. I fear, you might want to go there?

Third in the vicinity is the Byodoin Temple (see google). This place is overcrowded, but worth to visit. One of the temple's silhouettes you can find on the reverse side of the ten Yen coin.

And there is the Uji-gawa with cormorant fishers!

Sorry Klaus, I threw overboard my silly remarks from this morning, due to Oli Moss,

Reinhard

Reinhard
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carlomagno
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Location: Chile

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby carlomagno » Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:38 am

Much better now! Thank you Reinhard
Nec spe nec metu

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LUBlub
Posts: 3897
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Location: Europe

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby LUBlub » Tue Aug 01, 2017 11:57 am

Fantastic contributions!
JC try to contact the Japanese Members of INS ( see the INS list of members by country)... easy...
Have a nice journey!

Reinhard
Beautiful your fotos !
Last edited by LUBlub on Tue Aug 01, 2017 11:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
Excellence in netsuke art don't need signature or pedigree, or age, only quality, aesthetics, beauty.

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OliMos
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Location: London

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby OliMos » Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:39 pm

In 2014 we wrote a book on the calligraphy of the Obaku sect of Japanese Buddhism and their chief temple is Mampukuji. Finn went there on his last trip to Japan and said it was truly beautiful and not crowded. In our book we cited the first abbot of the Obaku sect, Ingen, a Chinese immigrant escaping the new Manchu rulers of China, to be the man who introduced sencha to Japan. Many sources refer to him as the originator.

But now I look at the link I used for Shisendo, it says that the owner of that house, Ishikawa Jozan, was the founder of sencha in Japan. How funny! I guess lots of people with a Chinese connection get apocryphally named as the introducer of sencha. Ishikawa Jozan was a major influential figure who was a Chinese style scholar and had relationships with the other major Confucian scholars of the day. The first 3 works of art in our 2010 catalogue "100 Years of Beatitude" were calligraphies by Jozan.

There is a wonderful book about Shisendo written collaboratively by 3 American and 2 Japanese scholars. Each deals with a different area, the garden, the architecture, his calligraphy and ends with one of the Japanese guys relating a ghost story from when he once spent the night there.

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souldeep
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Location: London

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby souldeep » Tue Aug 01, 2017 1:10 pm

lohrberg wrote:Spots in Japan

When Klaus Riess of Munic asked me today in a telephone call to post something in the "Tips for visiting Japan", I simply said "Ney". He asked me why. My answer: For the general track Tokyo, Kyoto, Nara, Osaka, Nagasaki there are tourist guide books.

I could recommend out of the way spots like Ojima Island, Mitsue, Miyama, Shirahama, Takayama, Takao san or the absolutely top Naoshima. But what sense does it make to recommend these or other places, when someone makes a first trip to Japan. Then there is Tokyo, Kyoto, Nara and Osaka. On a fifth or tenth trip one should do the off the track places.

Rienhard, I understand the reasoning for the new pilgrims of Japan. The major tourist areas already have extensive "must see" architecture and culture, and it may take many visits before there is a need to reach further a field.

However, your post has a deeper value. This thread will not only be read by the Original Poster (a new pilgrim), but also by others that are lucky enough to have already walked the known paths. Your post reaches far wider :)

For example - I very much appreciate the personal recommendations of a seasoned traveller. I am in the process of planning a trip with a few collectors. The trip is not being organised to take in first time tourist destinations, and those potentially coming understand this. Nor should the trip be a repeat of my favourite spots in Japan - I am not a guide, but part of the trip, and so must also get the chance to explore pastures new :)

There are a subset of readers here that sincerely appreciate the wider discussions around Japanese culture, aesthetics and travel. It doesn't have to have a netsuke attached. Please please do share travel adventures or blog on Japanese related subjects that interest you. If you are willing, go ahead and create new topics here in the Coffee Lounge forum.

I'm glad you chose the way of the Hai, it enriches, Nay stands still. Thanks.
Piglet: "Pooh?" Pooh: "Yes, Piglet?" Piglet: "I've been thinking..." Pooh: "That's a very good habit to get into to, Piglet." - A.A. Milne.

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souldeep
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Location: London

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby souldeep » Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:46 pm

OliMos wrote:There is a wonderful book about Shisendo written collaboratively by 3 American and 2 Japanese scholars. Each deals with a different area, the garden, the architecture, his calligraphy and ends with one of the Japanese guys relating a ghost story from when he once spent the night there.

Thanks Oli - I'm always looking for new reading material. Is it this book you refer to? https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2360656.Shisendo

If not might you share the title?

Thanks :)
Piglet: "Pooh?" Pooh: "Yes, Piglet?" Piglet: "I've been thinking..." Pooh: "That's a very good habit to get into to, Piglet." - A.A. Milne.

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OliMos
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Location: London

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby OliMos » Mon Oct 23, 2017 2:41 pm

Hi Martyn,

That's the very one. It's a great read and everyone tells me a great place to visit. A curator friend just went for the first time and sent me photos and it looks lovely.

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NetsukeManiac
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Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2010 3:05 am
Location: Scottsdale, Arizona

Re: Tips for visiting Japan

Postby NetsukeManiac » Mon Oct 23, 2017 11:44 pm

Tip 1: Bring an umbrella and raincoat.
Tip 2: Visit the Kyoto Antique Fair (Oct. 27 thru 29).

If you want to see a somewhat off the beaten path place, try Kanazawa. Just be sure to stay away from the beaches at night.

Dave


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