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Ittobori technique study

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DSW90049
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Postby DSW90049 » Sun Jan 24, 2016 4:58 pm

"[S]oulful to realize that your carving will live long, be handled and appreciated by so many, and find its way down through time and many lives." ~ Very well said, Judy!

I too see more, and appreciate more, of this carving style having read this Master Class Tutorial thread courtesy of Clive's generosity and expertise. Random thoughts on re-reading this thread:

On Judy's comment, I always let my dog smell my netsuke. Dogs have thousands of times the power of human smell. I watch her face and try to imagine all the smells of Old Japan that she smells . . . another way to appreciate what Judy said so well above.

I read long ago that Michelangelo reputedly said that, what he does as a sculptor, is to visualize the sculpture within the material, and then keep removing slices until the sculpture inside is revealed. I keep thinking of that as Clive explains the process.

The comparison to Cubism is stunning when you think about it.

Image
Pablo Picasso. Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. Paris, June–July 1907
Cubism is, in part, an attempt to see things from multiple perspectives all at once.
The single cut (not single knife) style of Ittobori is one take on that concept, but in three dimensions instead of two, as in Picasso's masterwork, above.

Wishing we had many more threads like this one - we are at our best here.


"There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . . "
Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning, H. Seymour Trower(1898)~~~~David

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Bakurae
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Postby Bakurae » Mon Jan 25, 2016 4:01 pm

Since the Michelangelo quotation has often been mentioned, it seems appropriate to quote his own words (my translation, from a sonnet I'll paste in below; Michelangelo was a poet as well as a sculptor, painter and architect).

Even the greatest artist has no conception
that a block of marble does not already contain within its mass,
attainable only by the hand that obeys the mind.

Interestingly, the poem in question is not actually about art, but introduces marble-carving as a metaphor for his struggle--in his view, unsuccessful--to get a human relationship right. The sense of failure makes him feel like an artist whose hand won't obey his mind.

Non ha l’ottimo artista alcun concetto
c’un marmo solo in sé non circonscriva
col suo superchio, e solo a quello arriva
la man che ubbidisce all’intelletto.
Il mal ch’io fuggo, e ’l ben ch’io mi prometto,5
in te, donna leggiadra, altera e diva,
tal si nasconde; e perch’io più non viva,
contraria ho l’arte al disïato effetto.
Amor dunque non ha, né tua beltate
o durezza o fortuna o gran disdegno,10
del mio mal colpa, o mio destino o sorte;
se dentro del tuo cor morte e pietate
porti in un tempo, e che ’l mio basso ingegno
non sappia, ardendo, trarne altro che morte.

Anyhow, I think most of the citations of Michelangelo's idea about finding a design already present in the marble lead back to the Platonic idea in the first four lines of that poem.


Alison

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DSW90049
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Postby DSW90049 » Tue Jan 26, 2016 4:07 pm

Thanks for posting the additional Michelangelo information and quote, Alison!

Having often thought of the mental image of the actual sculpture being contained inside the material and the quote, which I was not aware of, this additional information is most appreciated. For some reason, studying Ittobori brings out yet another facet of understanding of this concept.
"There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . . "
Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning, H. Seymour Trower(1898)~~~~David

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Leon
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Re: Ittobori technique study

Postby Leon » Sun Sep 11, 2016 3:39 pm

So I tried Ittobori a few times... It's a beautiful technique and I admire all who master it.
It is with hesitation I show you a humble attempt. But it has to be this very day because this day 175 years ago a Brit called John Rand patented his latest invention. A device that changed the history of art. It is not only my belief that without it there wouldn't be impressionisme as we know it. And as mentioned in this thread before, ittobori is the most impressionistic way to carve, to sculpt.
So let me honour John Rands invention, the paint tube!
(This carving goes in a sealed box. An attempt, nothing more.)
J.Rand.jpg
tube2.jpg
tube1.jpg

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AFNetsuke
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Re: Ittobori technique study

Postby AFNetsuke » Sun Sep 11, 2016 7:05 pm

Very cool, Leon. Did you leave the unraveling cord to represent paint squinting out?
Alan

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Leon
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Re: Ittobori technique study

Postby Leon » Wed Sep 14, 2016 9:19 am

Thanks Alan. I used white silk for the braid because the tube containing white is the most reached for by many painters.

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DSW90049
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Re: Ittobori technique study

Postby DSW90049 » Thu Sep 15, 2016 6:35 pm

Always good to see a wonderful older thread like this one revived . . . thanks!

Clive, did you make any more progress on the cicada since we visited with you last?
Have you exhausted your budget for SuperGlue yet?

For those who have not yet, this is quite a worthy thread to read through from beginning to end.
I just did that again, and Clive's insights and teachings about Ittobori are not only fascinating, but a powerful stimulus to further thinking.
I have a couple of Ittobori pieces, none masterworks, but taking them out and handling them again after re-reading the thread,
I think I get it even more.

We know the Impressionist painters of the second half of the 19thC were great admirers of Japanese art, including netsuke.
Wonder if the Cubist painters were, and if they knew of the Ittobori style?

Now THERE's a great subject for further research, and perhaps an INS Journal article . . . .
"There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . . "
Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning, H. Seymour Trower(1898)~~~~David


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