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Silver snowflake in shibuichi chasaji

JimKelso
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Postby JimKelso » Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:06 am

Here is a link to a photo gallery showing the sequence of inlaying a pure silver snowflake into the shibuichi chasaji tea-scoop shown in another thread. I intend to add more explanatory text but for now I hope the photos will give the general idea.

http://www.jimkelso.com/albums/snowflakeinlay/
"In all intellectual debates, both sides tend to be correct in what they affirm, and wrong in what they deny." John Stuart Mill

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DSW90049
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Postby DSW90049 » Thu Jun 27, 2013 3:09 pm

Love this!
THX Jim.
"There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . . "
Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning, H. Seymour Trower(1898)~~~~David

JimKelso
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Postby JimKelso » Fri Jun 28, 2013 12:02 pm

Thanks very much David.

Jim
"In all intellectual debates, both sides tend to be correct in what they affirm, and wrong in what they deny." John Stuart Mill

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RAF
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Postby RAF » Fri Jun 28, 2013 9:27 pm

This is perfect example of why I especially love kagamibuta netsuke. They sometimes get scant attention in the netsuke world (which is OK to me since it keeps the prices lower:)) but look at the level of effort and skill Jim took just to inlay one small piece in an overall design. Maybe I am wrong, but I think a skilled netsuke-shi, given the same amount of time that Jim used here, would probably be able to complete a large portion of a katabori netsuke. In other words, a quality mixed metal inlay kagamibuta lid is more time demanding than a quality crafted figural netsuke (but sells for less--which is maybe why the Chinese--or anyone else- dont seem copy them--and why current kagamibuta makers are as common as blimp pilots).
Beautiful work, Jim!
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JimKelso
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Postby JimKelso » Sat Jun 29, 2013 11:37 am


Ah RAF, while I certainly appreciate your accolades, thank you very much, I would never suggest a comparison between katabori and the metal arts in terms of one being more difficult. They are just too different in approach. Certainly to carve something very fully realized in the round with correct proportions, and everything just where it should be, is very difficult and time consuming.



One of the wonderful things about all the Japanese arts is the refinement of technique of each one, specific to its own material media. The best artists of each genre bring their their best technique, their best aesthetic sensitivities and their best imagination.



It's natural to have preferences. It's only to be expected that because most netsuke are wood or ivory, people who like those materials will be drawn to the field and metal may take something of a back seat. Similarly, in general, collectors of tsuba will find a lacquer tsuba, even by Zeshin, perhaps not so interesting.

Again, many thanks.

Jim
"In all intellectual debates, both sides tend to be correct in what they affirm, and wrong in what they deny." John Stuart Mill

www.jimkelso.com

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DSW90049
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Postby DSW90049 » Sat Jun 29, 2013 7:28 pm

Watching your steps in creating these, Jim, is what fascinates me.

You have to see what you are doing in your own mind before you undertake these steps, and it is that capacity, to see what you can create in a material staring up at you, before starting, that truly amazes me . . .
and, of course, you then have to work extremely hard to create it, because visualizing it alone, does not make it happen.;)
"There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . . "
Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning, H. Seymour Trower(1898)~~~~David

JimKelso
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Postby JimKelso » Mon Jul 01, 2013 11:34 am

Thanks very much David. Yes, much of the design has to be firmly in mind then on paper. The drawing is something like proof of concept. Of course the real essence only comes out in the subtleties of carving, texture and color and can't be conveyed in 2D. Some details of carving reveal themselves as the work proceeds. I don't visualize the total finished piece beforehand.
"In all intellectual debates, both sides tend to be correct in what they affirm, and wrong in what they deny." John Stuart Mill

www.jimkelso.com

niky
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Postby niky » Wed Jul 10, 2013 9:23 pm

RAF wrote:This is perfect example of why I especially love kagamibuta netsuke. They sometimes get scant attention in the netsuke world (which is OK to me since it keeps the prices lower:)) but look at the level of effort and skill Jim took just to inlay one small piece in an overall design. Maybe I am wrong, but I think a skilled netsuke-shi, given the same amount of time that Jim used here, would probably be able to complete a large portion of a katabori netsuke. In other words, a quality mixed metal inlay kagamibuta lid is more time demanding than a quality crafted figural netsuke (but sells for less--which is maybe why the Chinese--or anyone else- dont seem copy them--and why current kagamibuta makers are as common as blimp pilots).
Beautiful work, Jim!


Hi RAF i was wondering why kagamibuta is geting ignored; I like them and make them see http://nikysenater.com/ If the bawl is turned, then indeed the lid is where the work is.
I sell my kagamibuta way les than my katabori; incidentally the one on my site is sold but I intend to make an other one with a gold crab, a copper shrimp and a silver shell.

Jim's work is exquisite, I am in awe! We use different techniques but he is fenomenal!




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