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one of the first purchased

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souldeep
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby souldeep » Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:49 pm

Coincidentally another piece from Nagamachi's hand, displaying similar wear to the opening Shojo, popped up last night on a popular Netsuke sellers site. A useful comparison.

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In study, you will note Shuzan Nagamachi really is distinct from Shuzan Hogan in his colouration, treatment and style of carving. I suspect that the example Juan Carlos shared with us may have been rather less used than these other two examples. Evidence perhaps, if we agree Juan Carlos example is from the same hand, that the pieces left the workshop without simulated wear. This possibly supports that Nagamachi's technique with Saishiki didn't hold up well to handling or wear. Perhaps the application of Gesso was intrinsic to the lasting nature of paint applied on top. Neil - can you see any evidence of a layer of Gesso in the Nagamachi examples?

Obversely, and as Neil H points out, Mondo's work doesn't look like any examples we have posted thus far. In his case we tend to see paint flaking away instead. The suspicion is, Mondo used his technique to simulate age, so it would appear they may well have left the workshop already in this state.

As Neil also points out - Alan's example is in Negoro. This may well place it to a specific area of origin. This lacquering technique is named after the temple complex called Negoro-ji, near Osaka, that specialised in this technique. What is perhaps most appealing about this technique is that it embodies elements of Buddhist aesthetic. The red coating applied on top of the black was created specifically, to wear away and thus, increase the appeal and beauty of the piece. Red also being linked with many temple shrines, historically considered a sacred colour in Japan. I suspect, but cannot evidence, that Negoro works may have left the workshop already exposing areas of the black undercoating.
Piglet: "Pooh?" Pooh: "Yes, Piglet?" Piglet: "I've been thinking..." Pooh: "That's a very good habit to get into to, Piglet." - A.A. Milne.

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neilholton
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby neilholton » Wed Feb 01, 2017 3:36 pm

N-Shuzan. I cannot see an even application of gesso. I can see in crevices a type of white paste that N-Shuzan is applying to suggest he's applied the gesso layer. This is typical of this artist.

JC the piece you refer to as a Tennin is a Hagoromo.

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mss
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby mss » Wed Feb 01, 2017 11:53 pm

neilholton wrote:N-Shuzan. I cannot see an even application of gesso. I can see in crevices a type of white paste that N-Shuzan is applying to suggest he's applied the gesso layer. This is typical of this artist.

JC the piece you refer to as a Tennin is a Hagoromo.


I thought a hagoromo was a feathered cape worn by a tennin?

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AFNetsuke
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby AFNetsuke » Thu Feb 02, 2017 2:06 am

Per Wikipedia:
Hagoromo is also the name of a play. The earliest recorded version of the legend dates to the eighth century. The play however apparently combines two legends, one concerning the origins of the Suruga Dance (Suruga-mai) and another the descent of an angel onto Udo Beach. A parallel story may also be found in the 14th volume of the fifth-century Sou-shen chi. A poem by the 11th century poet Nōin is quoted.

The authorship of the Noh play Hagoromo is unknown. The earliest references to the play in historical records date to 1524.

Plot: A fisherman is walking with his companions at night when he finds the Hagoromo, the magical feather-mantle of a tennin (an aerial spirit or celestial dancer) hanging on a bough. The tennin sees him taking it and demands its return—she cannot return to Heaven without it. The fisherman argues with her, and finally promises to return it, if she will show him her dance or part of it. She accepts his offer. The Chorus explains the dance as symbolic of the daily changes of the moon. The words about "three, five, and fifteen" refer to the number of nights in the moon's changes. In the finale, the tennin disappears like a mountain slowly hidden in mist.
Alan

carlomagno
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby carlomagno » Thu Feb 02, 2017 2:57 am

Neil thank you for the hagoromo reference. After some reading, my nose still point at either is a tennin in full regalia or a dancer playing the tennin in hagoromo play. Isn't fantastic how much can somebody learn here?
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neilholton
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby neilholton » Thu Feb 02, 2017 8:05 am

JC & Milton, Sorry I should have been clearer.

Yes the the core theme is a Tennin. However, as the dancer is wearing a cape of feathers I determine this as a Hagoromo. Let me explain.

Ame no Uzume is the name for a Shinto Kami we know as Okame, but Okame is a comical play name. So there are some instances you would use Okame then others Ame no Uzume. We have an instance of this in our catalogue for the convention.

The same for a Fox. If a Fox has a key in its mouth, its an Inari messenger. If a Fox is wearing a habit and trousers its a fox priest. Though if its alone or with young, we say Fox. All of these are foxes but the subject differs.

The theme Hagoromo are mostly encountered in Manju or Ryusa form with a feathered cape nestled on pine branches. The finest example I have seen is by Rensai, and he carves the whole manju as pine to the front, turn it over the feather cape is draped across the pine. This manju and the dancer listed by JC should be in my view be described as Hagoromo as its a scene from the play.

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tanukisan
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby tanukisan » Thu Feb 02, 2017 1:15 pm

JC's netsuke theme ties in with the dancers thread earlier re the Tennin/ Hagoromo Noh Play and folk tale -
viewtopic.php?f=494802&t=8077920&start=10

John 


carlomagno
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby carlomagno » Thu Feb 02, 2017 6:25 pm

John, thank you so much, your heavenly lady s beautiful!!
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carlomagno
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby carlomagno » Fri Feb 03, 2017 11:21 pm

Another Shuzan N that caught my taste thanks to Lou. What do you think is the theme?
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Bakurae
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Re: one of the first purchased

Postby Bakurae » Sat Feb 04, 2017 12:33 am

I was admiring that one, too. Good for you, Juan Carlos!
Might the subject be Tokiwa fleeing with her youngest son? But then one would have to explain what happened to the other two sons.

Alison


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