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Cloisonné in Sagemono

Discussion of different types of materials used for netsuke.
calbear
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Re: pipe case addition

Postby calbear » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:51 pm

Martyn, how are these? ...

IMG_1840.jpg


IMG_1843.jpg

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AFNetsuke
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Re: Cloisonné in Sagemono

Postby AFNetsuke » Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:55 pm

I've had Steve's inro in hand and would not have guessed fine wires were used. Always something new to discover in collecting netsuke and sagemono.
Alan

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Clive
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Re: Cloisonné in Sagemono

Postby Clive » Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:40 am

Hello..
I think there is some confusion here but nothing particularly out of the ordinary than when specialized lacquer techniques that relate to the imitation of cloisonné are discussed in the Japanese lacquer literature. It's genuinely quite complicated and I'm not entirely sure of my interpretation of the terms but to clarify as best I can..
Zogan-nuri simply refers to the use of metal/wire inlays in lacquer which can be done in a way that is suggestive of cloisonné.. but it can also be used to produce effects that do not particularly look like cloisonné.
Like this for instance..
c89ed05b.jpg


There are however a group of Japanese lacquer terms that specifically refer to the deliberate imitation of cloisonné in Japanese lacquer.
The principle technique amongst them is called shippō nuri..
IMG_3533 (Edited).JPG

A variation of this technique is called oshidashi shippō nuri .. in which the 3 dimentionality of the imitation is somewhat less pronounced.. produced, I believe, by grinding back down a shippō nuri effect.
Then there are techniques that create an imitation of cloisonné but without using inlayed wire.
Techniques such as hiratai shippō nuri.. in which coarse particles of pigments, dry powders and coarse metal powders are spinkled on wet lacquer. That then is roughly ground down and the hollow spaces produced re-impregnated with lacquer to produce a more flush cloisonné effect.
Another technique is called iro urushi shippō nuri.. in which the wires found in traditional cloisonné are themselves imitated with fine sprinkled gold in hiramakie and the resulting spaces in-between filled with various coloured lacquers.
I'll see if I can find some examples of the last couple.

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souldeep
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Re: pipe case addition

Postby souldeep » Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:58 am

calbear wrote:Martyn, how are these? ...

Thank you Steve. Really quite an attractive work.
Piglet: "Pooh?" Pooh: "Yes, Piglet?" Piglet: "I've been thinking..." Pooh: "That's a very good habit to get into to, Piglet." - A.A. Milne.

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souldeep
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Re: Cloisonné in Sagemono

Postby souldeep » Thu Mar 15, 2018 12:04 pm

Clive wrote:I'll see if I can find some examples of the last couple.

Thanks Clive. Our typical western way of applying a categorisation to a Japanese technique has the potential to cause an underappreciation of the object we are studying.

Sharing the other examples, when you get the time, would be very interesting.
Piglet: "Pooh?" Pooh: "Yes, Piglet?" Piglet: "I've been thinking..." Pooh: "That's a very good habit to get into to, Piglet." - A.A. Milne.

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tanukisan
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Re: Cloisonné in Sagemono

Postby tanukisan » Wed Apr 11, 2018 9:27 am

Thought I might as well share my one and only and rather modest cloisonne single case inro example in this thread -
Attachments
DSCF4200.JPG

John 



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