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OldKappa

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Registered: Jan 24, 2007
Posts: 1,841
Reply with quote  #1 
Just received their preview listing (click here). As usual unfortunately still no photos on the 254 netsuke lots.

After a quick look it seems that it's going to be an interesting sale.

DSW90049

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Reply with quote  #2 
Photos w/ descriptions are now up on Eldred's for their 8/24-25/10 Auction Netsuke Lots.
Eldred's is linked under the Auction tab above.

I would be interested to hear what all think about what is offered this time around.  It does look interesting from absolutely a first glance; lots of lots to look over . . . . .


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“There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . .” -“Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning,” H. Seymour Trower(1898)                                 ~~~~David
jimfowlie

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Registered: April 10, 2009
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Reply with quote  #3 

What's your opinion of lot 116? I have one of the same subject matter by the same carver.


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DSW90049

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Reply with quote  #4 
quoting from Eldred's website @

http://www.eldreds.com/sales/detail.php?itemID=149057

"Lot #116
Temp #J112
Low Estimate
$2,000.00
High Estimate
$2,500.00
IVORY NETSUKE By Shunkosai Chogetsu. In the form of a squirrel with inlaid eyes perched on a stem of grapes. Signed."
This is actually one of the netsuke that caught my eye in this auction.  Something about the very smooth, round-faced and innocent looking squirrel surrounded by all those grapes.  There must be some association of squirrels and grapes from the world of Old Japan that I am not familiar with - it almost looks like the squirrel is disappointed that he has all these grapes, but that they are not nuts. Do squirrels eat grapes?
  I have not seen this subject before - has anybody else seen it or does anybody else know more about the meaning of squirrels and grapes?
  The piece also has that 'nice to hold' look.


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“There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . .” -“Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning,” H. Seymour Trower(1898)                                 ~~~~David
jimfowlie

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Posts: 189
Reply with quote  #5 
When I aquired the piece the fruit was described as Loquats. I don't know if this makes any difference to a story or fable from the past. Any comments on this would be of interest.
There is an interesting description in Wikipedia about the fruit in Japan.

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PETE

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Reply with quote  #6 
It's a fairly uncommon subject although I have seen it used on sword fittings too. I forget off the off top of my head the significance but I know where the reference to it is at home so I'll dig it out later and post it. For now, here's an example from my collection by Rensai.

Rensai Squirrel Netsuke
Shugenja

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Reply with quote  #7 
Although this animal is usually identified as a squirrel or a sarigue, it is actually what the Japanese call yamane...  a dormouse.  The dormouse eats grapes that then ferment in its stomach making it a bit inebriated.  But, the critter has the ability to run on tree branches while upside-down, so there must be a proverb in there somewhere.

Perhaps:  Yamane mo ki kara ochiru...  Even the dormouse falls from trees ! 
DSW90049

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Reply with quote  #8 
Shugenja, I believe you have cracked the door open on this one - I now have some approaches to figuring it out. 
Yamane = dormouse: who knew?

Wikipedia says this about the little rodents, if anybody is in need of a good snack:

"Relationship with humans

The edible dormouse was considered a delicacy in ancient Rome, either as a savoury appetizer or as a dessert (dipped in honey and poppy seeds). The Romans had a special kind of enclosure known as glirarium used to rear dormice for the table.[1] Dormice to this day are eaten in Slovenia.[2] Dormouse fat was used by the Elizabethans to induce sleep.[3]"

- useful little feller, no?

- the dormouse also played a role in Alice in Wonderland [from Wikipedia's plot synopsis]

"Alice attends a trial whereby the Knave of Hearts is accused of stealing the Queen's tarts. The jury is composed of various animals, including Bill the Lizard, the White Rabbit is the court's trumpeter, and the judge is the King of Hearts. During the proceedings, Alice finds that she is steadily growing larger. The dormouse scolds Alice and tells her she has no right to grow at such a rapid pace and take up all the air. Alice scoffs and calls the dormouse's accusation ridiculous because everyone grows and she can't help it". 

- now to figure out the grapes connection and what a netsukeshi of Old Japan way back when was trying to tell us here in the 21stC! 

-  Shunkosai has a few netsuke in Norman Sandfield's Netsuke Gallery, depicting either Pigs or Tigers with Hunters:

http://www.internetsuke.com/insarchive/key/Shunkosai




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“There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . .” -“Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning,” H. Seymour Trower(1898)                                 ~~~~David
jimfowlie

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Posts: 189
Reply with quote  #9 
I've been looking at the Eldred's sale and are lots # 199 & 435 the same pieces that were sold in Bonham's New York March sale (18256) lot # 2073? I thought at the time that was a bargain and if I had been there would have paid that amount for the lot of 3.

Jim

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Vlad

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Reply with quote  #10 

They certainly look like such, Jim. I just wonder where did the quails go?


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DSW90049

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Reply with quote  #11 
- Sure looks that way to me!

Lot No: 2073Y

THREE WOOD NETSUKE
19th century
The first, carved as an open crate of tangerines, the stems green hard stone, an ivory reserve on the lid inscribed Otoshidama, signed on the underside Toshu; the second, of a quail nibbling on millet seeds, signed in an oval reserve Kakukazu (?); the last, a blowfish with inlaid amber eyes and ivory teeth
1 1/8in (2.9cm); 1 1/8in (2.9cm); 1 1/2in (3.8cm)


Sold 
for $2,684 inclusive of Buyer's Premium

Footnote:
The first

Provenance: Ex-Gercik collection

Published: Hurtig, Bernard. Masterpieces of Netsuke Art: One Thousand Favorites of Leading Collectors (Tokyo: Weatherhill, 1973), no. 182, 61.
Lazarnick, George. The Signature Book of Netsuke, Inro & Ojime Artists in Photographs
(Honolulu: Reed Publishers, 1976), vol. 2, 1179.






http://www.bonhams.com/cgi-bin/public.sh/pubweb/publicSite.r?sContinent=EUR&screen=lotdetailsNoFlash&iSaleItemNo=4521113&iSaleNo=18256&iSaleSectionNo=1

HARD TO GET THE PHOTOS OF THE THREE TO COPY INTO HERE BUT THE LINK IS ABOVE FOR A LOSER LOOK

  As to where the Quail went, I think this comparison (of the three piece Bonham's lot with the Eldred's single piece offerings of two of the three) well illustrates how one goes about making a tidy profit in netsuke by buying the right multiple offering, breaking it up and selling some singly, otherwise known in other contexts as "cherry-picking."

As for the Quail, that went to pay somebody's kid's college tuition, perhaps.

Great eye there, Jim!






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“There is no shortcut to netsuke collecting; it takes time, study and patience. The market is flooded with utterly worthless rubbish. . . .” -“Netsukes: Their Makers, Use and Meaning,” H. Seymour Trower(1898)                                 ~~~~David
jimfowlie

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Registered: April 10, 2009
Posts: 189
Reply with quote  #12 

The reason I remember the piece so well is that, as I live in Aberdeen Scotland, I don't have much of a chance going to an auction in New York but I day dream and pick out a lot that I really like and see how it performs at auction. All three would have looked good in my display cabinet and at that price would have been in my range, especially as it was well under the guide price.
Another disappointment is that, if it is the same piece, Eldred's has spelt the name wrongly and they have not put in the providence that was given by Bonhams. This is a shame as it helps to know where the pieces have been in thier journeys.


Jim

 


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Jim (INS member)
Guido

Registered: June 5, 2010
Posts: 302
Reply with quote  #13 

All ivory items say "Not available for international delivery." Looks like they never heard about CITES (or think it's too much of a fuss) ...

OldKappa

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Registered: Jan 24, 2007
Posts: 1,841
Reply with quote  #14 
I am shocked by the prices realized in Bonhams' SF.

I know there where no high quality netsuke, but they made less than if they had been sold on eBay!
jimfowlie

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Registered: April 10, 2009
Posts: 189
Reply with quote  #15 

Anybody have any thoughts on the Elreds sale?


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